How To Secure Tickets for Concerts in Singapore online (SportsHub)

Sam Smith

Sam Smith concert details as on Sports Hub

Blessed that he released a second date for the concert! :’)

Based on my past experience of buying concert tickets online, when I googled for how to secure concert tickets in Singapore, the only news that appeared was about the horrendous black-market prices for concerts were shown (they could double up the ticket prices knowing the demand for them, gosh). So I did a guide through research from loyal KPOP friends on tips and this is the list of lessons I’ve adapted and tested for my Sam Smith concert. Hoping that this would be helpful should anyone want to read about buying concert tickets in Singapore!

(Do note that this is purely my experience of buying on SportsHub and I do not speak for the other websites or scenarios.)

GUIDE TO SECURING CONCERT TICKETS (for highly demanded concerts):

1. Create a SportsHub account in advance

When you manage to choose your spot eventually, they would ask you to register an account with your email address and home address (in case you opt for tickets to be mailed to you). So instead of setting up while being flustered about your seat, I suggest you create one beforehand so you don’t have to worry.

2. Select on “Buy Tickets” before the actual selling time

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Whenever there are concerts for superstars, there is a huge volume of people camping to secure tickets (like you!). Therefore, to manage the crowd, they place everyone in a holding area before distributing each one with a queue number when the actual sales of the tickets begin. Do note that to prevent people who script the website, and use bots to activate the Buy Tickets button, they do not have a first come first serve management system. Therefore, the queue is given at random. You may reach the queue at 8am, but when the actual sales start at 10am, someone who reached at 959am has the same chance as you. Don’t be like me.

But I do have to say, being early and just fast makes me feel secure. I could just leave my tab running at the background. They tag your URL with your queue, so you do not have to worry about leaving the queue so long as you have your URL with you. You could be browsing other tabs, or studying for your finals like I did. 🙂

3. Use multiple devices

Image result for gif multiple laptop

This was a tip given to me by my friend. Use as many devices as you can. Once you move from the holding area to the actual “queue” (when sales start), you are now officially tagged with a number that indicates your actual position in line. Depending on the number of people who are camping, the waiting time varies. And since this is a randomised order, you’d have no idea. I was on my brother’s laptop, my personal laptop and my phone. I got in from my brother’s laptop first, even though I signed in later than my own laptop.

If you have a friend, you could keep in contact with your friend to check who got in the selection arena. However, my friend had finals at 10am sharp (like the previous concert tickets selling dates too). This just increases your chances of getting in earlier and selecting the section that you want!

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Seating plan of “Thrill of It All” concert

Do note that you are however unable to select the exact seat or row that you want. They would assign it to you according to the algorithm they have. But I am assuming the nearer seats (obviously).

4. Prepare your Payment 

I checked SportsHub’s website beforehand and they only accept:

​Visa, MasterCard, JCB and AMEX are accepted via all booking channels. Cash and NETS are also available at the venue box offices and outlets.

The slightly prideful me was a little disappointed that I had to use my mother’s credit card. Do note that they’d have to send a SMS to the credit card’s owner’s mobile phone, so make sure they are able to tell you the pin! I was lucky my father came up on time, oh boy. Phew. Make sure you are prepared.

5. Read up on SportsHub (or the designated company) website

I was glad that on my first attempt that I didn’t get the tickets, I explored the page of FAQs and got answers that I was confused about. All except for the part where they didn’t explain why I hadn’t gotten my seat selection.

They have a lot of procedural information that is critical for you when you purchase the tickets. One of them is about the collection of tickets. A pro-tip from my friend is to opt for registered mailing or physical copies ($0.50 – $3) if you are going for the high end categories. She said that it’s safer in case your tickets get replicated yet you spent so much money! If you do not want to spend too much, you could opt for an email ticket where you can print at home for free and bring it on the concert day itself (which is what I did).

Of course, it would be helpful if you could gauge the demand for the concert. This second concert by Sam Smith wasn’t widely announced, therefore as of 2pm today there are still tickets available.

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Seating plan the next day

Once any of the devices successfully entered the selection arena, just choose the available sections, the number of seats (I think there’s a limit of 4 tickets per person) and you may proceed on for your payment. You can then leave the queue on your other devices and give those other fans a chance! It was an exciting moment securing these tickets and I hope this has been an informative post for you too!

That’s it! Wish you all the best in securing your own tickets!

EDIT (20191206)

Seeing that many people came to this site looking for information, I decided to keep this blog post more informative with the guide as the introduction instead. I still have my whole story below for my own reference purposes! 😀

Yikes!!!! I am so excited!!! I, FOR THE FIRST TIME in my life (!!!), bought concert tickets to an artiste that I admire so much!! I bought concert tickets for Sam Smith’s Singapore concert (May 03). It was my first time buying but having many concert go-er friends, I sought some advice and it may be useful for you and for my own future reference. So here was how it went.

This is Sam Smith’s first-ever concert in Singapore!! (also my first ever concert in my life) He originally had it only on a day, 2nd May. He is holding it in the Singapore Indoor Stadium and tickets were selling at Sports Hub. To which the amateur concert go-er AKA me, had 0 advantage in buying the tickets. I woke up at 11am, when the sales of the tickets started at 10am. When I entered the page and clicked, I was shown this image:

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Currently unavailable seating plan

I immediately consulted my friends and they were like: “Sold out alr”, “Finish liao”, “Try refreshing”. I knew from that point onward, that I was too late. I refreshed a couple of times, until about 1pm when the website announced that the tickets were sold out.

I felt really apologetic to the friend who wanted to watch the concert with me, and she was a little disappointed. The only upside was that we saved the money that would provide for 1/20 of one semestral worth of school fees. Nevertheless, we accepted fate and moved on. AND GOOD NEWS, Sam Smith decided to open another concert day in Singapore, a day after the original concert!!! This means we have another chance at securing our tickets!

Learning from my past experience, I googled, how to secure concert tickets in Singapore. The only news about the horrendous black-market prices for concerts was shown (they could double up the ticket prices knowing the demand for them, gosh). So I asked my friends what to do and this is about the list of lessons I’ve taken from there. Hoping that this would be helpful should anyone want to read about buying concert tickets in Singapore!

Thank you for reading through and I’d see you at the concert if you are going! 🙂

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